Who Knows?


As I'm sitting here eating an organic, grass-fed steak for lunch I'm wondering how on earth I know for sure that this meat is organic.  I'm trusting that the company that processes and packages the stuff is honest and is doing the right thing.  Not only did I pay more money for this kind of beef, but I did so believing that I will be less at risk of E-coli, and not subjected to ingesting unnecessary hormones.  I have no idea where all of this happens. I'll never see the farm where the cows are happily eating beautiful green, untreated  grass. I buy and consume this in complete trust.

My lunch today gets me thinking about all of the other situations in my life that call for my trust in (for all intensive purposes) invisible powers.  I trust that the gas companies really need to charge close to $4.00 per gallon (I think I just choked on my steak!).  I trust that the orange juice is really made from oranges.  I trust that the charities I give to are utilizing the money wisely.  I trust that the "Under 550" meals at Applebees really do have less than 550 calories.  It's hard to believe considering the portions and the taste.  But I purchase, consume, and trust.  I recently found a piece of wood in one of my cereal boxes.  My husband and I were discussing the possible scenarios that would cause such a thing.  I determined that perhaps the company was grinding up wood as the main ingredient in the cereal (instead of oats as the box declares)!   It does taste a bit like wood, but I trust that it is not.

I used to own and operate a rice pudding company.  I did this for about twelve years from my home.  Aside from the annual visits from the Department of Agriculture which inspected the kitchen for proper food handling equipment and proceduresn -- there was no organization that inspected the rice pudding itself.  I personally hired a laboratory to assess the nutritional content for the label, and I trusted that the information they gave me was correct.  I trusted them enough that I placed the results of their analysis on my product label.  Then of course the customers trusted the information on the label when they purchased the product.  But truthfully, I could have put anything in that pudding and nobody would have had any idea what I was doing.  We trust, and we have a lot to lose -- our money, our health, and potentially even our lives.

Why then do many people today refuse to trust in or even believe in God?  It doesn't cost a thing.  There is no risk involved.  There is only everything to gain.  Some people refuse to believe that which they cannot see, but as I noted above, we do this daily.  The same people will trust what they read in history books, but refuse to trust the Bible.  They will watch the news on television, yet scoff at the Good News.  They believe that a scientist can determine the age of a fossil dating back billions of years, but simply will not acknowledge the possibility that there is a much, much bigger picture than meets the eye.

Is it a matter of intelligence?  So then what does your intellect tell you, and how can you be certain?  Albert Einstein said:  "Information is not knowledge."  So true.  As many of the previous examples proved, the information we are fed does not necessarily make us more knowledgeable -- maybe just more gullible.  So how do we obtain real knowledge?  Whom do you trust to give you the true information that will make you knowledgeable?  St. Augustine said:  - “Do not go outside, go back into yourself, the heart of the creature lives in the truth."  I challenge you to sit in the silence and listen to the truth that will speak within you.  Once you've heard it, you will know and you will trust, and it will be much more real than anything tangible.  It will be much more trustworthy than any information you will absorb on this earth.  "Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free."










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